Review

The Lost Symbol by Dan Brown

This week is turning out to be a mystery week. I have read three mysteries in a row. ‘The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo’ and ‘The Girl who Kicked the Hornets’ Nest’ by Steig Larsson followed by ‘The Lost Symbol’ by Dan Brown.

Well, I should not be making a comparison of these three mysteries, as they belong to different genres and I enjoyed each one of them. But, I am still of the opinion that Dan Brown has an ephemeral quality that gives his novels an altogether different flavour, without resorting to repulsive crime scenes and queer relationships.

For a change, ‘The Lost Symbol’ does not begin with a murder, and rather opens on a friendly invitation to Robert Langdon from his friend Peter Solomon, to come to Washington.

But, very soon, the story changes tracks and Robert is once again riddled with the responsibility to solve the mystery and save the life and soul of his mentor, Peter Solomon. Unlike his previous novels, ‘The Da Vinci Code’ and ‘Angels and Demons’, this novel does not concentrate on the rivalry between Catholic church and Secret Sects. But, is rather based on the mysterious activities of The Free Masons.

As expected from Dan Brown, he transforms the town of Washington into a symbolic Fort of Free Masons with the brilliant wit of his protagonist Robert Langdon. With his sharp eyes, every monument of Washington is changed into something different.

The unusual storyline coupled with the fast pacing Dan Brownian wit makes this book a perfect thriller. The only problem in writing this review is that I do not want to say anything about the story, lest I divulge the secret and the charm of this thriller be exposed. However, rest assured that you would not even once be bored. It is a page turner and you won’t be able to keep it down for even a minute, once you started!

2 Comments

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